Particle Measuring Systems

Particle Measuring Systems
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Particle Measuring Systems

 •  February 6

The only optical techniques suitable for continuous monitoring of dispersed microcontaminants are single particle methods embodying imaging, light scattering, or light extinction. Ensemble optical techniques (where more than one particle is observed simultaneously and particle size information is measured from bulk scattering characteristics) are...

Particle Measuring Systems

 •  January 30

Particle Measuring Systems (PMS) created a machine for removing and counting particles off from three-dimensional surfaces. The machine, the Surfex®, includes a DI water recirculating filtration system, an ultrasonic tank with ultrasonic transducers, a liquid particle counter, and an ISO Class 2 minienvironment. The DI water is particle-counted...

Conventional molecular contamination monitoring systems employ a multi-point air sampling system connected to an analyzer. This monitoring approach has evolved into normal practice, driven by the need to monitor a large number of locations at the lowest reasonable cost. However, significant issues arise in today’s 193 nm semiconductor fabrication...

Particle Measuring Systems

 •  November 30, 2017

Most modern microcontamination control strategies have moved away from continuous monitoring of cleanrooms. Cleanroom technology has improved over the years, combining robotics and factory automation with high-efficiency particulate air filtration. Particle-free cleanrooms measured at 0.3 µm are commonplace. As part of this evolution, special...

Particle Measuring Systems

 •  November 28, 2017

Through continuous process and equipment advancements, semiconductor manufacturers are approaching 7 nm feature sizes and heading even smaller, while hard-disk drive fly heights are now less than 10 nm. This ever-reducing device feature size requires comparable cleanliness-level improvements in ultrapure water (UPW). UPW purity is especially...

Particle Measuring Systems

 •  November 14, 2017

Particle counters are used in many applications ranging from cleanroom and clean air device classification in accordance with specified standards, testing of filter installation, portable environmental monitoring programs, in-situ environmental monitoring systems and the fault diagnosis of specific processes. Historically, there has been a single...

Particle Measuring Systems

 •  November 6, 2017

The revised United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) chapter Microbial Control and Monitoring of Aseptic Processing Environments includes a thorough description, definition and guidance on microbial control and monitoring in aseptic processing environments. Chapter is arguably one of the most comprehensive informational chapters from the USP, and it is...

Particle Measuring Systems

 •  October 20, 2017

Our previous blogs on this topic discussed monitoring for certification and qualification. Today we address ongoing monitoring. The location of the monitoring points should be based upon a formal risk assessment (FMEA, FMECA or other risk analysis tools) using data from the certification and qualification testing. Other factors, such as equipment...

Particle Measuring Systems

 •  October 18, 2017

Our previous blog discussed monitoring for certification. Today we address monitoring for qualification. Learn more about the difference by downloading our paper Choosing the Most Suitable Particle Sample Point Locations in the Cleanroom. The qualification phase considers the risks to the quality of the finished product. Each activity must be...

Particle Measuring Systems

 •  October 17, 2017

Following the last blog which discussed three categories of monitoring requirements, we move onto monitoring specifically for certification. Cleanroom certification is based on ISO 14644-1, “Classification of air cleanliness by particle concentration” standards. The specifics of the assessment may vary slightly for FDA or EU GMP regulations, but...