EMA Publishes Further Guidance to Prepare for Brexit While Industry Groups Call for Transition Period

On 24 November 2017, the European Medicines Agency has published a practical guidance document on post-Brexit Changes. The Practical Guidance for procedures related to Brexit for medicinal products for human and veterinary use within the framework of the centralised procedure comes in the form of nine questions and answers and outlines the...

On 24 November 2017, the European Medicines Agency has published a practical guidance document on post-Brexit Changes. The Practical Guidance for procedures related to Brexit for medicinal products for human and veterinary use within the framework of the centralised procedure comes in the form of nine questions and answers and outlines the practical and simplified requirements that companies should follow when they apply for changes to their marketing authorisation.

 

This will be necessary to allow for the continued marketing of medicine in the European Economic Area after the anticipated UK withdraws from the EU on 30 March 2019. Marketing authorisation holders, applicants and sponsors of centrally authorised medicines for human or veterinary use should consider how Brexit will impact their medicines and which changes need to be addressed before the UK leaves the EU. They also need to ensure that the necessary changes are made by that date.

On 28 November 2017 the EFPIA (European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations) has published a statement on its website calling for a transition period:

We urge Brexit negotiators on both sides to agree on a transition period that adequately reflects the time needed by companies, as well as all relevant authorities at EU and national level to adapt to changes in view of the UK exiting the EU. The transition period should provide for continued EU-UK partnership on the regulation and supply of medicines, to avoid supply disruption while moving forward towards a future cooperation agreement between the EU and the UK.

The various industry groups of the European and British life science industry have further emphasised that for their sector “Brexit represents a challenge in several areas, notably regulatory procedures, quality testing of medicines, supply chain, trade, and intellectual property. For example, medicines companies may need to submit applications for the transfer of marketing authorisation for many products, move batch release sites and duplicate quality testing for products or move personnel into either jurisdiction. This will take a significant amount of time and will result in capacity issues which cannot be resolved before March 2019.”

Click here to get to the EFPIA's view on Brexit.

Source:

EMA: News and events

 

 

 
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Source: www.gmp-publishing.com